Whole Wheat Bread

by Sara on August 29, 2009

whole wheat bread

This was the first loaf of bread I baked when I started my 30 Day Challenge. Because I had planned on making a BLT, I wanted a bread that was both tasty and hearty, something that would stick with me to keep me satisfied.

At first I really liked it. It had the honey wheat flavor that you’d expect, but then I noticed it left a bit of an aftertaste. Now, I’ve had my whole wheat flour for awhile now, and because of a major lack of space in my refrigerator…well, the flour has been in the pantry. All summer. The strange aftertaste could very well be my own fault for not storing the flour properly.

Even so, I did really enjoy this bread toasted in the morning, topped with a little butter and some jam. The bread has enough heft to deliver a satisfying breakfast that will keep you going for hours.

This is a very simple bread to make, so if you haven’t mustered up the courage to tackle a yeast bread, I’d encourage you to try this one.

Whole Wheat Bread
recipe from King Arthur’s Flour

1 packet active dry yeast dissolved in 2 tablespoons water
1 1/3 cups water
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup honey
3 1/2 cups King Arthur Traditional Whole Wheat Flour
1/4 cup nonfat dried milk
1 1/4 teaspoons salt

In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine all of the ingredients and stir with a dough hook until the dough starts to leave the sides of the bowl. With the mixer on medium-low, knead it for 6 to 8 minutes, or until it begins to become smooth. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover the bowl, and allow the dough to rise till puffy, about 60 minutes.

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board, and shape it into an 8-inch log. Place the log in a lightly greased 8 1/2 x 4 1/2-inch loaf pan, cover the pan loosely with lightly greased plastic wrap, and allow the bread to rise for about 1 hour, or until it’s crowned about 1 inch above the edge of the pan.

Preheat oven to 350*F. Remove the plastic wrap and bake the loaf for twenty minutes. Tent with aluminum foil and bake for another twenty minutes. Test for doneness by tapping the top of the loaf (it should sound hollow) or by inserting an instant read thermometer (it should read 190*F) into the center of the loaf.

Cool the bread for fifteen minutes, then remove from pan to a wire rack. Cool completely before slicing and store wrapped in plastic.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Sonya September 5, 2009 at 2:55 pm

I have got to overcome my fear of yeast. I would so love to learn how to make bread of all kinds..I am just really intimidated when it comes to using yeast and I dont know why.

Sara September 5, 2009 at 10:48 pm

Sonya, I used to have the same fear, but then I tried a few recipes that involved “proofing” the yeast. All that means is that the yeast was added to hot tap water and given some sugar to feed it. Let it sit for ten minutes or so – it will get very puffy on top and smell very yeasty. As long as that happens, you know the yeast is fine and your bread should turn out great.

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